Hundred-year-old Corn Fritters Recipe

Remember the first time you had corn on the cob this summer? . . . and, how special it was? . . . and, how much you ate? The corn was so sweet and tender. Back then, I’d buy a half-dozen ears at the farmer’s market – and my husband and I could easily polish it off at one meal.

Now, as the season winds down, I’m getting a little tired of corn. So when a neighbor gave me ten ears of corn a few days ago, I was looking for ways to use it. And, then I remembered Corn Fritters. . .

I found an incredible recipe for Corn Fritters in a hundred-year-old cookbook. The Fritters were crispy on the outside and contained just the right amount of corn. The recipe was perfect – it was both easy to make and tasty. Bring on the corn!

Here’s the original recipe:

Lowney’s Cook Book (1912)

And, here’s the recipe updated for modern cooks:

Corn Fritters

  • Servings: 15-20 fritters
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

1 cup corn (fresh corn cut from the cob is best; canned creamed corn could also be used)

1 cup flour

1 teaspoon salt

dash red pepper

1 egg

1/2 cup milk

1 tablespoon olive oil

shortening or lard

Put flour, salt, red pepper, egg, milk, and olive oil in a mixing bowl; beat until combined. Add corn and stir until the corn is evenly distributed throughout the batter.

Heat 1/2 inch of shortening until hot in large frying pan. Drop spoonfuls of batter into hot shortening. Β Flip fritters and fry until golden brown on both sides. Remove from heat and drain on paper towels. Serve immediately.

Cook’s note: The original recipe called for 2 teaspoons salt. This seemed like a lot to me, so when I updated the recipe I only used 1 teaspoon.

37 thoughts on “Hundred-year-old Corn Fritters Recipe

  1. That brings back memories! We also used to buy corn cakes (as we called them) at The Market House in Williamsport. It is hard to get good corn here and nothing compares to PA corn. When we go up to PA in the summer, we eat it everyday.

  2. I haven’t had one bite of corn all this summer. I have no idea why. We’re well past our sweet corn season now, but I’m tucking this into the files for next year. This looks rather like the fried sweet corn I had in a restaurant. It was delicious, but now, even though I remember the food and who I was with, I can’t remember which state we were in. Goodness!

      1. DingDingDing! It was Paola, Kansas, during my long trip last fall. It kept bugging me, so I called my aunt (who was one of my dinner companions that night) and she knew right away. She always remembers the good food.

  3. The first time I made corn fritters was from the American Girl cookbook from when American Girl dolls were just Kirsten, Molly, and Samantha. They were in the Samantha section. I’ve made them several times since. One thing to note, fry carefully. Fresh corn has a high water content and can pop and splatter.

  4. So nice to be reminded of corn fritters, I always like molasses on mine,while some of the children would do ketchup. Good recipes just never die . πŸ™‚

    1. I never would have thought of putting ketchup on Corn Fritters – but now that you mention it, I’m tempted to give it a try the next time I make this recipe. πŸ™‚

  5. Omgosh! 2 teaspoons salt! Woe!
    Your adjusted recipe looks and sounds delicious.
    I don’t recall ever having corn fritters, but I may have to give them a try. πŸ˜€

    1. 2 teaspoons of salt had to have been a typo. I can’t even imagine how they would have tasted with that much salt – but I’m sure it won’t have been good.

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