Hundred-year-old Interior Decorating “Rules”

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Thursday, October 8, 1914: <no entry>

Source: Ladies Home Journal (October, 1914)
Source: Ladies Home Journal (October, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I’ll share some “rules” there were  in the October, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal about how to decorate rooms:

There are certain general rules that govern the furnishing of every room in the house, whether it be living-room, dining-room, or bedroom that is under consideration.

  1. Beginning with the floor, see that the covering for this is of a slightly darker color than that selected for walls.
  1. The colors used for your wall, of course, depend upon the amount of light admitted to the room and also upon the exposure. For a south light, which is in itself warm, choose cool colors, light greens and blues; on the other hand, for a north light select warm colors like tones of yellow and red.
  1. Do not use a decidedly figured paper in the same room that you used figured draperies. Figured draperies should be used only with plain paper.
  1. When your paper is figured, be careful not to put too many small pictures on your walls or the effect will be spotty.

 

Tea Tables a Hundred Years Ago

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, October 6, 1914: <<no entry>>

1914-07-21 a

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I thought that you might enjoy seeing some pictures in the July, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal of  set tea tables.

Afternoon tea is now such a well-established custom that many people would as soon think of going without their luncheon as of omitting their tea.

Having afternoon teas is a pretty custom, for they mean informal gatherings of friends, and hospitality that is easy to show.1914-07-21 b

In fact an afternoon tea is one of the simplest and most delightful ways of entertaining a few persons, and they should be few, for the charm is lost when there is a crowd.

The table may be made beautiful. Every dainty touch adds so much to its attractiveness, and such a table is an expression of the taste and individuality of a thoughtful hostess.

1914-07-21 d

1914-07-21 e

An aside—Does anyone set tea tables anymore?