1922 Poem About Desserts

Poem About Desserts and Puddings
Source: Cement City Cook Book (1922, Compiled by First Baptist Church, Alpena, Michigan)

Who were “New Women” a hundred years ago? — flappers,?

A hundred-year-old church cookbook from Alpena, Michigan had  a different definltion. This fun poem was at the beginning of  the Desserts and Puddings chapter.  Alpena is on Lake Huron in northeastern Michigan.

25 thoughts on “1922 Poem About Desserts

    1. I’m often amazed how relevant some things from a hundred years ago are today. I’m also sometimes surprised about how much some other things have changed.

  1. There is an interesting article about the New Woman at Wikipedia, complete with photographs and graphics! The term was used in 1894 by an Irish writer, referring to “Independent women seeking radical change” and further emerged from there. I think I will order my “bicycle waist” for my next cycling venture. Cool post, Sheryl!

    1. I had a similar impression. The poem’s message seemed somewhat retro in an era when the suffragettes had recently had major successes, and flappers were redefining what women could do. Maybe the peom was a reaction to a more generally accepted definition of “new woman.”

    1. I bought the cookbook that contained this poem off Ebay. I thought the the name, The Cement City Cook Book” seemed very unusual, so I googled Alpena. I was surprised to discover that cement is still being manufactured there – just as it has been for more than a hundrd years.

  2. There is a large bulk hauling ship in the Great Lakes named after this city that is part of the laker fleet. Alpena and other city ports in the Great Lakes had wonderful economies in the first half of the 20th century. It is wonderful that a local cookbook from 1920’s let us see a peek into their lives. Thanks for sharing.

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