Keep Coffee Warm with a Thermos

Source: Good Housekeeping (October, 1917)

A household hints column in a 1917 issue of Good Housekeeping invited readers to send in their tips for possible publication Readers whose submissions were published received $1 from the magazine. One hint was to keep coffee warm in a thermos bottle when entertaining.

Let the Thermos Help Out

I find my thermos bottle comes in handy when I wish to serve coffee to more people than my percolator will accommodate. My percolator will hold six cups. This I make in the regular way an hour or so before I wish to serve it. Pour it into the thermos bottle, which of course, would keep it hot for hours, and then proceed to make another potful to be ready just in time to serve. The coffee in the thermos bottle I hold in reserve for the second helping.  — Mrs. M.E., Minn.

Good Housekeeping (October, 1917)

35 thoughts on “Keep Coffee Warm with a Thermos

    1. Do you think so?

      I use a Thermos a lot when I’m on the road, and particularly when I’m doing something outdoors. I’ve often really welcomed a hot cup of coffee from a Thermos.

    2. they need to be scrupulously clean ; )
      I use those “denture” cleaning tablets (the kids used them on their retainers, too)

  1. A good thermos is a joy forever. I still remember the red plaid one that we’d take to football games, filled with hot chocolate. It would stay hot in the thermos, and take less than five minutes to grow cold once it was poured.

        1. Oh those glass ones were terrific! I still have one of my Mother’s and it comes out for us to use each Holiday : ) They used to make “replacements” for the inside, but don’t know if they are still available.

          1. Until you mentioned it, I’d totally forgotten about how they used to make “replacements” for the inside. I think that we needed to buy them several times when I was a child. We kids were hard on thermos bottles.

  2. I was really surprised that Thermos bottle go back that far. In looking it up, I see where the Thermos company has been around since 1904, which I would have never have guessed.

  3. Aaah, this takes me back! My grandmother always used coffee pitcher 9822 (or almost identical) for her breakfast which she took up to bed every morning – she had a large jug for coffee and a smaller one for hot milk. And I still have them! I occasionally get them out – we had a large gathering here earlier this year and I needed to make coffee in advance – always a pleasure to use them. They have cork stoppers, and must be over 60 years old, but still work as good as new.

  4. I had that red plaid thermos, too! And, of course, the ones that came in metal lunch boxes with the clip. And Mom always warning me not to bread it or I’d get glass in my drink. I still need to have my coffee piping hot, and I still have an old fashioned thermos for long road trips. I would love to have that one on the right in the photo here!

    1. This brings back memories of the lunch box and thermos I had in elementary school. Both the box and the thermos were pink, and had drawings of black poodles and the Eiffel Tower on them. I thought I looked very stylish when eating lunch in the school cafeteria.

  5. Love the picture! That’s exactly what we did at home when I was growing up, then in our house brewing two pots…until the Keurig entered as a gift and allowed guests to brew a cup from the selection according to their individual taste.

      1. I actually really dislike Keurigs. Probably because I never have one cup of coffee. I never drink it past the early morning, but I always have several cups. Now that hotels have Keurigs that means I have to keep making cup after cup.

      2. Does anyone still use a peculator to make coffee at home? I recall my parents using their electric peculator to make coffee when they invited people over for dinner, which is the only time they ever used it. By my recollection, the coffee from it was excellent.

  6. Thermos for coffee! There is something about coffee that just pronounces irresistible! Only coffee can infuse magic into conversations and is an indispensable part of friendly gatherings.

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