Old Poached Egg in Tomato Recipe

Source: Lowney's Cook Book (1912)

Eggs and tomatoes make a nice pairing, so I was excited when I  saw a new way to make eggs and tomatoes in a hundred-year-old cookbook – Poached Egg in Tomato.

Preparing the tomato shell for the egg reminded me of scooping a pumpkin but on a much smaller scale. And, it was fun to slide the egg into the tomato shell, and cover it with a circle of parchment paper that I’d cut out.

The Poached Egg in Tomato was delightful with toast. The one downside – it took longer to bake than I anticipated.  I had to delay breakfast because it took about 45 minutes for the egg white to fully set.

Poached Egg in Tomato

For each serving:

1 medium tomato

1 egg

salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 350° F. Cut the top of the tomato and gently scoop out the pulp, then set the tomato in a ramekin or custard cup. Break the egg into a small bowl, then slide the egg into the tomato shell, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cut circles from a piece of parchment paper that is the same size as the ramekin; then cover the filled tomato with the parchment paper circle.

Place the ramekin into a small cake pan or other oven-proof dish or pan. Gently pour hot water (approximately 125° F.)  into the pan until it is about 1 inch deep. (I use the hottest water that comes out of my tap.). Place into the oven and cook until the egg is desired firmness (approximately 45 minutes).

Poached egg in tomato a
Source: Lowney’s Cook Book (1912)

 

54 thoughts on “Old Poached Egg in Tomato Recipe

    1. Thanks for the kind words. I often struggle with my food photography, and its wonderful to hear that you liked this picture. I also was pleased with how it turned out.

  1. This looks and sounds delicious. I will have to buy me some tomatoes and try it. I showed it to my husband and he wants to try it too. Thanks for sharing. I hope to be making this soon, 🙂

    1. I think that you’ll like it. In the photo I have the toast on the side – but it actually works really well to serve the egg and tomato on the toast. The tomato will produce some juice that the egg poaches in while cooking, and it’s lovely when the egg/tomato mixture slips out onto the toast when you break it apart to eat .

    1. I think that you’ll enjoy it. If you get a chance, let us know how long it took to cook, etc. I’m always trying to collect information on others’ experiences with these old recipes because it helps other readers who may want to try it.

  2. I do love tomatoes and eggs together, and this is a combo I’ve never seen. It’s easy, and I suspect very tasty. The long bake time wouldn’t be a problem for a weekend breakfast, or even for a light supper.

    1. You’re right – the long bake time won’t matter if you were expecting it. Somehow I totally failed to correctly guess how long it would take, so my husband and I ended up with a late breakfast. 🙂

  3. Ohhh this sounds lovely, my mum used to make a similar one but scooped out a bread roll, lined it with ham and put egg in middle we were only talking about that the other week and now this egg and tomato which are one of my favorite combinations. Thank you Sheryl 🙂

    1. hmm. . . maybe I should have titled it “Old Fashioned Poached Egg in Tomato Recipe.” I hadn’t thought about how it could have another meaning.

  4. Right now we have a glut of tomatoes and eggs, the hens are laying non stop, so this will certainly be on the menu today for lunch, outside on the terrace under the shade of the lime tree – perfection, thanks!

  5. Ooh, this sounds so good! I love eggs but I get so tired of just frying them every day. I’m totally giving it a try tomorrow 🙂

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