Old-fashioned Creamed Turnips

Creamed Turnips in Bowl

I recently came across a hundred-year-old recipe for Creamed Turnips, and decided to give it a try. Creamed Turnips makes a lovely side dish. I served them with pork chops, and the earthy sweetness of the turnips immersed in a velvety cream sauce perfectly complemented the meat.

Here’s the original recipe:

Recipe for Mashed Turnips
Source: Mrs. Scott’s Seasonal Cook Books (The North American Newspaper, Philadelphia, Autumn, 1920)

One teaspoon of salt seemed like a lot of salt for the Cream Sauce, so I only used 1/2 teaspoon.

Here’s the recipe updated for modern cooks:

Creamed Turnips

  • Servings: 5 - 6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

2 pounds turnips

1 tablespoon butter

1 tablespoon flour

1 cup milk

1/2 teaspoon salt

dash pepper

Peel the turnips, and cut into 1/2-inch cubes. Put the cubed turnips in a saucepan, and cover with water. Bring to a boil using high heat, then reduce heat and simmer until tender (about 15 minutes). Remove from heat, drain, and put in serving bowl.

Cream Sauce

In the meantime, melt butter in another saucepan. Stir the flour into the butter. While stirring constantly, slowly pour in milk and bring to a boil over medium heat. Add salt and pepper, then reduce heat and continue boiling for 2 minutes while stirring constantly.  Pour cream sauce over the turnips.

http://www.ahundredyearsago.com

34 thoughts on “Old-fashioned Creamed Turnips

  1. If I were served this dish, I would taste a teaspoonful. I’ve never yet been tempted to eat more than that. We were served turnips every Thanksgiving, prepared by someone who was a terrible cook. I’m sure your dish is a thousand times better.

      1. I read somewhere that most Brussels Sprouts are less bitter now than what they once were. Something about plant breeders figuring how how to reduce the bitterness.

  2. Turnips were never on our family table, but when the kids were small, a book I had recommended always adding them to vegetable soup. I started doing so and continue to. I also include them when I roast winter vegetables. But this sounds interesting. I may try it!

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