Frozen Canned Apricots

I select most of the hundred-year-old recipes that I post on this blog because they genuinely sound like something I might enjoy. But, occasionally I chose a recipe because it seems so odd. This is one of these times.

The March, 1920 issue of American Cookery featured Frozen Canned Apricots – which is basically canned apricots frozen in the can. After they are frozen, they are removed from the can, and placed on a plate in the middle of a circle of marshmallow cream.

In 1920, there were few photos in magazines, but the editors of American Cookery were so enthralled with this recipe that they included not only the recipe, but also a photo.

Frozen Canned Apricots on Plate
Source: American Cookery (March, 1920)

The Frozen Canned Apricots were surprisingly tasty. My daughter said, “This is better than most of the recipes you make.” I decided that it was best not to probe too deeply into what that meant, but I think that it was praise.

There was a downside to the recipe. I didn’t really like the way it looked on the plate. If I made this recipe again, I think that I would just put the canned apricots and syrup in a freezer box,Β  freeze – and then scoop the frozen mixture into bowls with a little marshmallow cream topping.

Here’s the original recipe:

Recipe for Frozen Canned Apricots
Source: American Cookery (March, 1920)

The old recipe called for freezing the contents of the can using ice and salt (somewhat similarly to how ice cream is made). A hundred-years-ago, most cooks probably didn’t have freezers, but since I have one, I decided to just open a can of apricots, cover it with plastic wrap, and freeze it in the freezer. This worked fine.

The old recipe called for a pint (2 cups) of marshmallow cream. When I made the recipe, that seemed like too much, so I only used approximately 1 cup.

Here’s the recipe updated for modern cooks:

Frozen Canned Apricots

  • Servings: 2 - 3
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

1 can apricots (15-16 oz.)

approximately 1 cup marshmallow cream

Remove lid from can of apricots. Cover with plastic wrap, then secure the wrap with a rubber band. Put in freezer until frozen. (I froze it overnight.) About an hour before serving, remove from freezer, and let sit at room temperature. When ready to serve, make a circle of marshmallow cream (approximately 7-8 inches in diameter) on a plate. Slide the frozen apricots out of the can, and then place the frozen apricots in the middle of the marshmallow cream. Serve immediately.

http://www.ahundredyearsago.com

36 thoughts on “Frozen Canned Apricots

  1. This may be the oddest thing I’ve seen — at least, the oddest thing promoted for anyone over the age of eight to present at the dinner table. Like you, I’d at least present it differently!

    1. I had similar thoughts. I also googled “marshmallow cream” and found a Wikipedia article which suggested that commercially-prepared marshmallow cream was a new product in the 1910’s, so people might have also been looking for ways to use it.

    1. It’s a spread that tastes like marshmallows. In some regions of the U.S., people use it to make fluffernutter sandwiches, which are peanut butter and marshmallow cream sandwiches.

    1. We just took a serving spoon and scooped off pieces with the spoon. Its look does have some similarities to cranberry sauce. Now that I think about it, the Frozen Canned Apricots might look better if they were flipped on their side and served like cranberry sauce.

  2. This is definitely novel. This might just be “THE dessert” for my MIL. She can’t have dairy so the frozen apricots and the marshmallow cream would circumvent the dairy prohibition!

    1. It was very tasty and refreshing. I think that the main issue was the serving suggestion. If it was presented in a more aesthetically pleasing way, it would be good.

  3. My eyes boggled at this! I couldn’t wrap my head around it. Fascinating though. I’ve never heard of marshmallow cream. How interesting to hear how the can was frozen. I was laughing at your daughter’s comment.xxx

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