1914 Kodak Folding Brownie Camera Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, August 8, 1914:  A thunderstorm came on about midnight. Was glad Mr. Brownie wasn’t out in the rain. I tried to picture the result.

Source: Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine (July 1, 1914)

Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (July 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Whew, Grandma that was close. Thank goodness you got “Mr. Brownie” in before he got wet.

The previous day, Grandma wrote:

. . . Hope Mother dear doesn’t see this. Something would happen if she did. I bought a brownie. It is a little over a week e’er we go to Niagara Falls, and well the temptation was too great. I didn’t want Ruthie to lay her eyes on that package. She has such a way of divining things. I left Mr. Package under a cherry tree, where I felt sure it would not been seen. After dark I smuggled it into the house and up to my room.

Since Grandma was so interested in photography and developing film, I’ve done several previous posts that included other advertisements that you might enjoy:

1913 Film Tank Advertisement

1913 Kodak Camera Ad

1913 Kodak Vest Camera

1914 Kodak Advertisement in Farm Magazine

An Upcoming Trip

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, August 7, 1914:  Florence and I walked to Watsontown this afternoon. She couldn’t stay till train time. Ma wanted me to go to Milton to get her teeth. It was nice and breezy riding down on the car.

Hope Mother dear doesn’t see this. Something would happen if she did. I bought a brownie. It is a little over a week e’er we go to Niagara Falls, and well the temptation was too great. I didn’t want Ruthie to lay her eyes on that package. She has such a way of divining things. I left Mr. Package under a cherry tree, where I felt sure it would not been seen. After dark I smuggled it into the house and up to my room.

1909 Kodak Brownie Camera*

1909 Kodak Brownie Camera (Manufactured: 1909-1915)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Wow, Grandma, there’s a lot in this diary entry. You’re getting downright wordy.

Niagara Falls! You’re going to Niagara Falls! Last spring you wrote that you went to Williamsport—which is only 20 miles away—for the first time in your life. And, now you’re going all the way to Niagara Falls! Awesome!. . . Tell us more.

Is the “brownie” a camera? Why would your mother have been angry if she’d known you’d purchased it? You have so much fun taking, and developing, photos. In my humble opinion, you definitely need to new camera to record the trip.

See any cherry trees?DSC04327

DSC04328

Ruth (or Ruthie in this diary entry) was Grandma’s sister. I have no idea who Florence was. This is a new name in the diary.

Hundred-year-old Pictures of Painted and Stenciled Furniture

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, August 4, 1914:  Forgot what I did today.1914-06-35 e

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’ll share some ideas for stenciling and painting furniture that were in the June, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal.

Did Grandma ever paint or stencil a dresser or chair to beautify her bedroom? When I was young I used to enjoy “antiguing” furniture with paint to give it a new look. Maybe Grandma also enjoyed giving old furniture a new look.

1914-06-35 cThe simple pattern on the slats is stenciled in white.

1914-06-35 GWhen painted  yellow and stenciled with a leaf motif in green, a chiffonier makes an attractive piece of furniture.

1914-06-35 dThe washstand can be treated in a like manner.

 

Made Ice Cream

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, August 2, 1914:  Went to Sunday school this morning.Besse and Curt came out towards evening. They brought ice and we made ice cream.

I couldn't find an old photo of chocolate ice cream, but here's a picture of vanilla ice cream with chocolate sauce that was in Lowney's Cookbook (1912).

I couldn’t find an old photo of chocolate ice cream, but here’s a picture of vanilla ice cream with chocolate sauce that was in Lowney’s Cookbook (1912). See this recipe in a previous post: Hundred-year-old Recipe for Vanilla Ice Cream with Chocolate Sauce.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

mmm. . . Ice cream and cake sound good.

It’s weird, but I have a vague sense of changing technology and transportation across the 3 1/2 years that I’ve been posting the diary entries.

Grandma’s family often made ice cream on Sundays when her married sister Besse and her husband Curt came to visit. However, I think this is the first time they had ice cream during the summer.

In the past they always made it during the winter when ice was readily available. I think that they got the ice out of animal watering troughs or from the creek. For example, on January 22, 1911 Grandma wrote:

Went to Sunday school and church this morning. Made ice cream. That is my sister made it and I assisted. I got the ice. Besse and Curt came out this evening. Just when Ruth and I were having a little spat all to ourselves.

(Grandma sometimes had ice cream during the summer at a festival—and once at a friend’s home— but never at home.)

Besse and Curt lived in nearby Watsontown. My take is that technology and transportation were changing—and that it was easier (or at least less expensive) to get ice during the summer months in 1914 than had been back in 1911.

Life is an Ever-changing Scene

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, August 1, 1914:

The summertime is passing on,

To summers that have gone before.

Life is an ever-changing scene,

Which we would fair explore.

Am beginning to count the days until the 17th beams upon my horizon. Ruth and I went to a festival up in town given for the benefit of the church.

DSC03608

Site of the McEwensville Baptist Church years ago. Was the festival held at the church? It’s difficult to picture a church and a festival on this lot.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

There are hints about so many things in this diary entry—but so little substance. What is going to happen on the 17th? What did you and your sister Ruth do at the festival? Did you see the person mentioned in yesterday’s diary entry?

. . . Went to a surprise party this evening. It was over at Carrie’s. Enjoyed myself as much as I usually do. I think no doubt remains as to the state of my feelings concerning somebody.

July 31, 1914

I assume you wrote the poem, but you’re only 19—and in some ways the monthly poem sounds like it was written by someone much older.

For more information about the monthly poems see this previous post:

Monthly Poem in Diary

Someone Special

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today:

Grandma would have walked down this road to get to Carrie’s house.

Friday, July 31, 1914:  Made a business trip to Watsontown this morning, and I must say it was arranged to my satisfaction. Went to a surprise party this evening. It was over at Carrie’s. Enjoyed myself as much as I usually do. I think no doubt remains as to the state of my feelings concerning somebody.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma-

Who is it? More details, PLEASE!

Before and After Town Beautification

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today:

Thursday, July 30, 1914: About the same as the other days.

.

1914-04-45 a

1914-04-45 b.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma did not write much a hundred years ago, I’m going to share another set of’  ‘before’ and ‘after’ pictures that were in the April, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal. The title of the article was: “What was Done in Some Towns and What You And Do in Yours.”

.

1914-04-45 c

1914-04-45 d.

.

.

1914-04-45 e

.1914-04-45 f.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 939 other followers