The Canada Goose in a Hundred-Year-Old Book

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, October 14, 1914: << no entry>>

Source: The Bird Book (1914)

Source: The Bird Book (1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Fall is here. Some things haven’t changed much across the years. Did Grandma see any Canadian Geese flying South a hundred years ago today?

Here’s what a book published in 1914 had to say about the Canada Goose.

Canada Goose

Range: The whole of North America, breeding from northern United States northward, and wintering in the southern parts of the United States. Its familiar “honk” and V-shaped formation in which the flocks migrate is always an object of interest to everyone.

The Bird Book  by Chester A. Reed

Blister on Finger

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, October 12, 1914:  Nothing much doing. Have a blister on my finger from giving it too much exercise. Adieu till something happens as the days go by.DSC06516

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

LOL Grandma—I love your sense of humor, but PLEASE find something worthwhile to write soon. Writing in your diary may be losing meaning for you, but we hang on every word you write and need to hear your daily words.

Picture Taken Under Apple Tree

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, October 11, 1914:  Went to Sunday school this morning. Carrie was over this afternoon, and we had our pictures taken under an apple tree and sitting on the pasture bare.

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

It must have been a lovely October day if Grandma and her friend Carrie Stout decided to have someone (her sister Ruth?) take their picture.

I’m a little confused by the phrase “sitting on the pasture bare.” The modern literal interpretation of the phrase makes no sense within the context of the times. Is the pasture bare. . . of grass? . . . of cows? . . . of fallen apples?

Took Two Pictures!!

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, October 9, 1914: Took two pictures this morning.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

It’s awesome that you’re still enjoying your hobby, but more details please.

What was special enough to justify taking TWO pictures? You always use such care when deciding to take a picture. Film is so expensive—and if you are sending the film off to be developed that costs a lot, too. . . and if you’re planning to develop the pictures yourself, that’s a lot of work.

An aside:  A new Friday Update is posted on my author website, Sheryl Lazarus.com. This week I’m trying to figure out what I want to do during the final months of A Hundred Years Ago.

Went to an Entertainment

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, October 9, 1914: About once a week take the notion to write. Well, there really wasn’t anything important. Ruth and I went to an entertainment given in Watsontown. Some fine music I listened to.

Here's a picture of Watsontown--though I don't know where the Opera House was located. Perhaps the building no longer exists.

Here’s a picture of Watsontown–though I don’t know where the Opera House was located. Perhaps the building no longer exists.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Welcome back, Grandma! We’ve missed you. The day-to-day happenings in your life are more important than you think.

Did you and your sister Ruth go to the Watsontown Opera House? I’ve heard that the theatre’s name is more presumptuous than the actual building—but that it’s the best place in town to see good performances.

Hundred-year-old Interior Decorating “Rules”

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Thursday, October 8, 1914: <no entry>

Source: Ladies Home Journal (October, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (October, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I’ll share some “rules” there were  in the October, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal about how to decorate rooms:

There are certain general rules that govern the furnishing of every room in the house, whether it be living-room, dining-room, or bedroom that is under consideration.

  1. Beginning with the floor, see that the covering for this is of a slightly darker color than that selected for walls.
  1. The colors used for your wall, of course, depend upon the amount of light admitted to the room and also upon the exposure. For a south light, which is in itself warm, choose cool colors, light greens and blues; on the other hand, for a north light select warm colors like tones of yellow and red.
  1. Do not use a decidedly figured paper in the same room that you used figured draperies. Figured draperies should be used only with plain paper.
  1. When your paper is figured, be careful not to put too many small pictures on your walls or the effect will be spotty.

 

Tea Tables a Hundred Years Ago

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, October 6, 1914: <<no entry>>

1914-07-21 a

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I thought that you might enjoy seeing some pictures in the July, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal of  set tea tables.

Afternoon tea is now such a well-established custom that many people would as soon think of going without their luncheon as of omitting their tea.

Having afternoon teas is a pretty custom, for they mean informal gatherings of friends, and hospitality that is easy to show.1914-07-21 b

In fact an afternoon tea is one of the simplest and most delightful ways of entertaining a few persons, and they should be few, for the charm is lost when there is a crowd.

The table may be made beautiful. Every dainty touch adds so much to its attractiveness, and such a table is an expression of the taste and individuality of a thoughtful hostess.

1914-07-21 d

1914-07-21 e

An aside—Does anyone set tea tables anymore?

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