1914 Jokes

cartoon 1

Source: Ladies Home Journal (October, 1914)

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, October 26, 1914: << no entry>>

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I thought you might enjoy some jokes that were in the October, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal.

She Knew From Experience

“What is conscience”” asked the Sunday school teacher.

There was a dead silence from the class.

“Oh, you know, “She said encouragingly. “What is it that tells us when we do wrong?”

“I know,” said the littlest girl in the class. “It’s Grandma.”

He Started Something

“Now,” said the farmer to the new hand from the city, “I want you to clean up the pigsty and the stable and the henhouse and all the other houses of the stock.”

The new hand worked vigorously for a couple of days. Then he appeared before his employer with both eyes nearly closed, his mouth swollen, and red lumps all over his face and neck and hands.

“Gimme my money,” he said,  “I’m a-goin to quit.”

“What’s the matter?” said the farmer.

I don’t know what’s the matter,” said the victim, “but it happened when I started to clean the beehive.”

Picking Them Out

The Governor of a Southern State came in to his office with a friend one morning to find a number of men waiting in the anteroom. Pausing an instant he told a story that was a decided “chestnut.”

When they got inside the private office the friend said: “That was a horrible one you sprung on those fellows.”

“I know it,” chuckled the Governor, “but did you notice the ones that laughed?”

“Well, I noticed that three or four did.”

“Those, said the Governor, “are the fellows who won’t get in to see me. They are the ones who have favors to ask.”

He Did It

“If any man here,” shouted the temperance speaker, “can name an honest business that has been helped by the saloon I will spend the rest of my life working for the liquor people.”

A man in the audience arose. “I consider my business honest,” he said, and it has been helped by the saloon.”

“What is your business?” yelled the orator.

“I, sir,” responded the man, “am an undertaker.”

Profiting by a Lesson

Young Tommy returned from school in tears and nursing a black eye.

“Betcher I’ll pay Billy Bobbs off for this in the morning,” he wailed to his mother.

“No, no,” she said, “You must return good for evil. I’ll make you a nice jam tart and you must take it to Billy and say, ‘Mother says I must return good for evil, so here’s a tart for you.”

Tommy demurred, but finally consented. The next evening he returned in a worse plight and sobbed, “I gave Billy the tart and told him what you said. “ ‘N then he blacked my other eye and say to send him another tart tomorrow.”

Old Cartoon About Piano Playing

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, November 14, 1913:  My music teacher didn’t think, or I mean she did think, that I hadn’t practiced my lesson any too much. It didn’t surprise me any for I didn’t put much work on it.

1914 piano cartoon

Source: Watsontown Record and Star (May 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

I wonder if this old cartoon would have resonated with Grandma . . . or  with her parents. 

Cartoon Making Fun of Suffragettes

17-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, March 14, 1913: Nothing doing.

Cartoon Making Fun of Suffra

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’ll share an old cartoon about suffragettes that appeared in the April 4, 1914 issue of the Watsontown Record and Star.

Today it’s hard to perceive why anyone would think that women shouldn’t have the right the vote—it’s interesting to get a sense of the opposite perspective from this cartoon.

The Watsontown Record and Star is a long defunct newspaper from a town very near to where Grandma lived. I’ve only ever seen a few issues of it. But it probably was a newspaper that Grandma regularly read, and it probably reflected commonly held opinions in her community.

We’ve come a long way!!

Patent Medicine Cartoon

17-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, June 18, 1912: I seemed to have had sort of a hard time today.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Sounds like things still weren’t going well. The previous day Grandma wrote that she didn’t feel well, but that no one took it seriously.

Yesterday, I posted an old advertisement for a patent medicine. A hundred years ago, they were controversial and were just beginning to be regulated by the government.

Here’s a cartoon about patent medicines that appeared in the September, 1910 issue of National Food Magazine.

A SUGGESTION FOR AN “AD” FOR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING BABY KILLERS:

BEFORE TAKING

“That’ll make it stop crying, 50 cents, please.”

AFTER TAKING

<<drawing of crying mother>>

Early Farm Management Cartoon

16-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, August 30, 1911: Really there isn’t very much for today, so I won’t write about any of the occurrences.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since not much happened a hundred years ago today, I’m going to share a cartoon I found in the July 15, 1911 issue of Kimball’s Dairy Farmer magazine.

Caption: What system and good management do for the dairy farmer.

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