1914 Halloween Magazine Cover

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Thursday, October 29, 1914: << no entry>>Halloween Kimball's

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I thought that you might enjoy seeing the cover of the October 15, 1914 issue of Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine.

Amazingly Kimball’s was published twice each month (on the 1st and the 15th). I previously showed you the other October, 1914 cover. It was the orange one with a woman leading a cow.

1914 Kalamazoo Stove Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, October 28, 1914: << no entry>>

1914-12-64 a

Source: Ladies Home Journal (December, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma’s providing no clues about what was happening in the Muffly household, I’m left to guessing. Since, the days are getting cooler, the kitchen stove probably was no longer enough to keep the house warm. Was a stove in the living room now also being used?

1914 Jokes

cartoon 1

Source: Ladies Home Journal (October, 1914)

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, October 26, 1914: << no entry>>

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I thought you might enjoy some jokes that were in the October, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal.

She Knew From Experience

“What is conscience”” asked the Sunday school teacher.

There was a dead silence from the class.

“Oh, you know, “She said encouragingly. “What is it that tells us when we do wrong?”

“I know,” said the littlest girl in the class. “It’s Grandma.”

He Started Something

“Now,” said the farmer to the new hand from the city, “I want you to clean up the pigsty and the stable and the henhouse and all the other houses of the stock.”

The new hand worked vigorously for a couple of days. Then he appeared before his employer with both eyes nearly closed, his mouth swollen, and red lumps all over his face and neck and hands.

“Gimme my money,” he said,  “I’m a-goin to quit.”

“What’s the matter?” said the farmer.

I don’t know what’s the matter,” said the victim, “but it happened when I started to clean the beehive.”

Picking Them Out

The Governor of a Southern State came in to his office with a friend one morning to find a number of men waiting in the anteroom. Pausing an instant he told a story that was a decided “chestnut.”

When they got inside the private office the friend said: “That was a horrible one you sprung on those fellows.”

“I know it,” chuckled the Governor, “but did you notice the ones that laughed?”

“Well, I noticed that three or four did.”

“Those, said the Governor, “are the fellows who won’t get in to see me. They are the ones who have favors to ask.”

He Did It

“If any man here,” shouted the temperance speaker, “can name an honest business that has been helped by the saloon I will spend the rest of my life working for the liquor people.”

A man in the audience arose. “I consider my business honest,” he said, and it has been helped by the saloon.”

“What is your business?” yelled the orator.

“I, sir,” responded the man, “am an undertaker.”

Profiting by a Lesson

Young Tommy returned from school in tears and nursing a black eye.

“Betcher I’ll pay Billy Bobbs off for this in the morning,” he wailed to his mother.

“No, no,” she said, “You must return good for evil. I’ll make you a nice jam tart and you must take it to Billy and say, ‘Mother says I must return good for evil, so here’s a tart for you.”

Tommy demurred, but finally consented. The next evening he returned in a worse plight and sobbed, “I gave Billy the tart and told him what you said. “ ‘N then he blacked my other eye and say to send him another tart tomorrow.”

Need a Woman Over Ffity Feel Old?

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, October 22, 1914: << no entry>>

women over fifity

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Another silent day. . . But I came across an editorial about women over fifty that resonated with me (probably because I’m a woman over fifty), and I thought you might also enjoy it. Here are some excerpts:

Need a Woman Over Fifty Feel Old?

An Editorial by Jane Addams

One of the most remarkable changes in the lives of women in this country has been the postponement of old age.

Chiefly because they had nothing else to do, our grandmothers, after their children had been reared and safely launched into homes of their own, expected to give their remaining years to a general oversight of the households of their sons and daughters. A vigorous woman, accustomed to the cares of a large household in which her word was law, when deprived of an absorbing occupation could not all at once reduce herself to a negligible quantity, and the traditional “mother-in-law” was quite as much the victim of circumstances as were the cherished family upon whom her unused energies were expended.

Happily there is another type of woman. The Woman’s Club movement has been a great factor in developing the powers of women who are over fifty years old. Many of them learned to write papers, to address audiences, to preside over meetings, to organize committees for the first time after they had passed that age. The women’s clubs also gave to thousands of women their first sense of responsibility in regard to public education and civic reform.

It was largely through the efforts of these club women that kindergarten, manual training, and domestic science were introduced in the public-school system of America.

These same elderly women who, in their youth, had been sheltered from any knowledge of crime and the ways of criminals, and who would have considered it most unladylike even to refer to a disreputable woman, were often responsible for securing matrons in the police stations, teachers in the jails, the establishment of juvenile courts and the abolition of vice districts.

One woman of sixty whom I know is most widely useful in many church activities, not only in the local circles of her denomination but also as the president of a State organization.

A woman over fifty years old is the executive head of a national organization which has for years urged and secured better conditions for working women and children, both through legislation and voluntary efforts. She has moved from one difficult piece of social organization to another until probably no one else in the Unites States is more conversant with the conditions of working women and children, and the laws which have been enacted on their behalf.

That weariness and dullness, which inhere in both domestic and social affairs when they are carried on by men alone, will no longer be a necessary attribute of public life when such gracious and gray-haired women become a part of it, and when new social movements, in which men as well as women are concerned, naturally utilize woman’s experience and ability.

Ladies Home Journal (October, 1914)

Before and After Houses

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, October 18, 1914: << no entry>>

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I thought that you might enjoy some before and after pictures of houses in the August, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal.

House 12Bright yellow, walls, a black roof and a bright green porch roof was the riotous color scheme of the house above.

House 11Very slight alteration produced this summer home. All the flimsy filigree work was removed and the second-story porch with dignified white columns was added. Paint of a lovely ivory tine was chosen for the exterior walls.

 

Home  8As originally build this house presented an exterior about as plain and homely as one could find.

Home 9The second picture, however, shows how successfully the present owner has transformed it –and at very little expense. The roof was carried down to form the porch roof of an outdoor living-room. Colonial yellow paint and vines gave the finishing touches.

 

House 7This house is not really ugly, but certainly it is unattractive.

House 8Removing the roof, porch, and bay-window left a good foundation for the new house. The sun room at the left and the porte-cochere at the right give a breadth which tends to overcome the high stilted look it previously had. Repointing the stone work and the new roof complete the transformation.

 

Royal Easy Chair Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, October 19, 1914:

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma did so much hard physical labor on the farm. Did she ever have time to sit down and put her feet up?

I hope that she had a Royal Easy Chair (though my gut feeling is that the Muffly’s didn’t own any easy chairs).

An aside: If you interested in reading my preliminary ideas, based on readers comments, about how to celebrate the end of Grandma’s diary in late December, there’s a new Friday Update on my author website, Sheryl Lazarus.com. Don’t worry if you don’t have time to look at this site–when it get’s closer to the end of the year, I’ll bring the ideas over to A Hundred Years Ago.

October, 1914 Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine Cover

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, October 16, 1914: << no entry>>

Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine October 1, 1914

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred-years-ago today, I thought you might enjoy seeing the cover of the October 1, 1914 issue of Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine.

The orange cover design with the picture of a woman (with lipstick ?) and two cows doesn’t quite work for me—but it may have been considered progressive at the time.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,064 other followers