1914 Kodak Folding Brownie Camera Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, August 8, 1914:  A thunderstorm came on about midnight. Was glad Mr. Brownie wasn’t out in the rain. I tried to picture the result.

Source: Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine (July 1, 1914)

Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (July 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Whew, Grandma that was close. Thank goodness you got “Mr. Brownie” in before he got wet.

The previous day, Grandma wrote:

. . . Hope Mother dear doesn’t see this. Something would happen if she did. I bought a brownie. It is a little over a week e’er we go to Niagara Falls, and well the temptation was too great. I didn’t want Ruthie to lay her eyes on that package. She has such a way of divining things. I left Mr. Package under a cherry tree, where I felt sure it would not been seen. After dark I smuggled it into the house and up to my room.

Since Grandma was so interested in photography and developing film, I’ve done several previous posts that included other advertisements that you might enjoy:

1913 Film Tank Advertisement

1913 Kodak Camera Ad

1913 Kodak Vest Camera

1914 Kodak Advertisement in Farm Magazine

Farm Electricity Plants a Hundred Years Ago

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, August 5, 1914: Ditto

Source: Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine

Caption: The washing of the greasy, smoked lamp chimneys and the dangerous practice of carrying a lantern into the hay mow are done away with. Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (October, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

The previous day Grandma wrote that she, “Forgot what I did today.”

Since nothing was happening in Grandma’s life that merited mention in her diary, and since I’m still fascinated with how technology was changing a hundred years ago, I’m going to go off on another tangent.

In 1914 electricity was widely available in larger towns—though it had not yet come to McEwensville. However, some farmers were beginning to install generators and batteries that could be used to produce electricity.

I don’t really understand how the systems worked, but here’s what an article in the October, 1914 issue of Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine said:

The Farm Electricity Plant

For the operation of the little plant, less skill is required than to run the simplest automobile. It contains a gasoline engine of 1 1/2 horsepower, an electric generator or dynamo, a storage battery of 16 small cells, which can be placed on a shelf 8 inches wide by 5 feet long and a simple switchboard. The generating part weights but 160 pounds.

The cost of lamps and wiring will be about $3 per lamp, more or less, depending on the conditions and grade of materials employed. An estimate of materials and wiring may be obtained from a local electrician or contractor. Or the farmer may buy the materials and do the wiring himself at odd times. This is a simple matter with the aid of a good book on wiring.

1914 Knox Gelatine Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today:

Wednesday, July 29, 1914:  Nothing much these days.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I thought that you might enjoy this advertisement.

 

1914 Johns-Manville Asbestos Roofing Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, July 20, 1914:  Nothing of importance.

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Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’ll share a hundred-year-old ad that I found a bit unsettling. Today we hear so much about the problems with asbestos. I was surprised to see an ad for asbestos roofing in the March 15, 1914 issue of Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine.

Dangerously Humid: 3 Die in NYC

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Thursday, July 16 – Friday, July 17, 1914:  Am having a hot time of it.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

This is the second day of a two-day diary entry. New York City is about 125 miles east of McEwensville. Here’s what the New York Times had to say about the weather there on July 17, 1914.

Source: New York Times (July 18, 1914)

Source: New York Times (July 18, 1914)

The weather sounds oppressive—and dangerous. My favorite line in the article is:

There is a light southerly breeze at the Battery, but it as warm as if it had blown over the Sudan desert at Wadi Halfi. . .

Somehow high humidity and desert breezes don’t seem like they belong in the same sentence. . . but whatever. . . It’s a very graphic description. :)

Sufficient Rainfall: Crops Making Promising Progress

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, July 14, 1914:  It’s raining some these days. One can even tire of the rain for a time.

DSC04615

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

I understand! I tire of rain very quickly, too. But rain is good.

It looks like Pennsylvania (and most of the rest of the country) is getting enough rain, and the crops are doing well. I bet that your father is happy.

Source: Wall Street Journal (July 15, 1914)

Source: Wall Street Journal (July 15, 1914)

 

Acme Dress Form Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, July 10 – Saturday, July 11, 1914:  Forgot the particulars of these days.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

 Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write any specific for this date, I’ll share an advertisement that I found for Acme Dress Forms. I knew a few people who had dress forms when I was a kid. Does anyone have them anymore?

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