1914 Pomeian Olive Oil Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, September 18, 1914: Nothing to write.

1914-02-61 a

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I thought you might enjoy this 1914 ad.

Sometimes I’m amazed at some of the companies that have been around for more than a century. According to Wikipedia:

Pompeian, Inc. is a food company that was founded in Baltimore in 1906 and produced America’s first national brand of imported extra virgin olive oil.

 

House Jackets (Sweater Vests) a Hundred Years Ago

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Thursday, September 10, 1914: Called on Carrie this afternoon.

1914-09-39 e

Source: Ladies Home Journal (September, 1914)

This design is the ever-useful “hug-me-tight,” of waist length and with a pretty variation in collar and sleeves.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Carrie Stout was a good friend of Grandma’s who lived on the nearby farm. In my mind, I picture Carrie and Grandma sitting in a quiet corner of the living room, leaning forward towards each other while excitedly chatting about Grandma’s recent trip . . . guys . . . neighborhood gossip. . . whatever.

Were the days starting to get cooler? The house may have had a chill since the heating stove in the living room probably wasn’t yet operating.  Maybe Grandma and Carrie wore “house jackets” (I think that I’d call these sweaters, sweater vests, or short-sleeved sweaters, but the September, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal called them house jackets.)

1914-09-39 cHouse jackets of soft fleecy worsted are as popular as ever and each year brings to us some dainty new designs. The one in pale blue is made in almost straight lines and designed to wear in the house or under a coat. The revers form a good chest protector if one is needed with an open coat.

1914-09-39 dAn adorable kimono which every woman loves is unmistakable in the pink-and white-garment.

 

1914 Cold Cream Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, September 8, 1914:  Went to town again and got some of the things I wanted. Did manage to forget some too. When I got home Carrie was here.

1914 Cold Cream Advertisement

Source: Ladies Home Journal (May, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

More details please! What did you buy? Did you buy some Daggett & Ramsdell Cold Cream? You recently got a ride in an auto—and maybe are hoping for another one. It’s vital that you’re prepared!

The previous day Grandma went to town with her father—but had forgotten that stores were closed because it was Labor Day.

Carrie Stout was a friend of Grandma’s who lived on a nearby farm.

Stores Closed on Labor Day a Hundred Years Ago

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today

Monday, September 7, 1914:  A foolish girl I was today. Took it into my head that I wanted to go to town to buy some things this afternoon. Well I went. Rode in with Pa. While on the way I thought it will be altogether useless, as the store would not be open since it was Labor Day.

Recent Photo of Watsontown

Recent photo of  downtown Watsontown

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Labor Day? . . . Oh, of course, this was the first Monday in September in 1914. This year Labor Day was on the earliest possible date; in 1914 it was the latest possible date.

Stores are open around here on Labor Day.  In 1914,  it must have been a bigger deal if stores were closed– though it apparently was a bit random whether schools were open. In 1912, Grandma wrote:

Had to go to school, even if it is labor day. We had this day off last year. . .

September 2, 1912

Photo of Ruth Muffly and her Students

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, September 1, 1914:

The summer flowers we bid adieu

To brighter days and balmier hours

There short brief life is well nigh spent

For with the summer goes the flowers.

It seems rather lonesome here without Ruthie, but still have enough to take up my time.

Source: The History of McEwensville Schools by Thomas Kramm (Used with permission)

Source: The History of McEwensville Schools by Thomas Kramm (Used with permission)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

It was the first day of school for Grandma’s sister Ruth. She taught at the Red Hill School during 1914-15. This school was at the south end of McEwensville. It was a different school than where she’d previously taught.

Whew, it looks like Ruth had 9 boys, and 1 girl in her class. I bet she had a handful.

Monthly Poem

For more information about the poem on the first day of each month see this previous post:

Monthly Poem in Diary

1914 Wrigley’s Spearmint Gum Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, August 24 – Thursday, August 27, 1914:  For lack of something to write.

1914 Wrigley's Spearmint Gum Advertisement

Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (March 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

This is the last of four days that Grandma combined into one entry. Since she didn’t write much, I thought that you might enjoy this hundred-year-old advertisement for Wrigley’s Spearmint Gum.

1914 Kodak Folding Brownie Camera Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, August 8, 1914:  A thunderstorm came on about midnight. Was glad Mr. Brownie wasn’t out in the rain. I tried to picture the result.

Source: Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine (July 1, 1914)

Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (July 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Whew, Grandma that was close. Thank goodness you got “Mr. Brownie” in before he got wet.

The previous day, Grandma wrote:

. . . Hope Mother dear doesn’t see this. Something would happen if she did. I bought a brownie. It is a little over a week e’er we go to Niagara Falls, and well the temptation was too great. I didn’t want Ruthie to lay her eyes on that package. She has such a way of divining things. I left Mr. Package under a cherry tree, where I felt sure it would not been seen. After dark I smuggled it into the house and up to my room.

Since Grandma was so interested in photography and developing film, I’ve done several previous posts that included other advertisements that you might enjoy:

1913 Film Tank Advertisement

1913 Kodak Camera Ad

1913 Kodak Vest Camera

1914 Kodak Advertisement in Farm Magazine

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