Setting

Main street in McEwensville in the early 1900s. Photo source: Watsontown, McEwensville, and Delaware Township: A Real Photo Postcard History by Robert Swope, Jr. (Used with permission)

2010 photo of the same section of Main Street, McEwensville.

Another photo of McEwensville today

McEwensville High School in 1907. Photo source: Watsontown, McEwensville, and Delaware Township: A Real Photo Postcard History by Robert Swope, Jr. (Used with permission)

Recent photo of building that once housed McEwensville High School.

Grandma grew up on a farm near  McEwensville  in Northumberland County in central Pennsylvania.  The farm was located in a rolling agricultural valley located between the West and North branches of the Susquehanna River.  The hauntingly beautiful Appalachian Mountains loom on the distant horizon.

1908 view of McEwensville. Photo taken from a hill overlooking the Muffly farm. Photo source: Watsontown, McEwensville, and Delaware Township: A Real Photo Postcard History by Robert Swope, Jr. (Used with permission)

See Old McEwensville Photos for additional photos and information about Watsontown, McEwensville, and Delaware Township: A Real Photo Postcard History.

Watsontown Road, the road Grandma once  walked to McEwensville, is now split into two dead-end pieces (Raup’s Road and Mill Road)  by Interstate I-180.  In the late 1960’s the road was moved when I-180 was built.  Now the  road, Warrior Run Creek, and the railroad tracks all go under one interstate bridge. The roads on the map show how it is now, but the identified locations show how it was in 1911.

The road Grandma walked to McEwensville now dead-ends at Interstate I-180.

7 Responses

  1. I love the way you have set up this diary blog. I have always wanted to go to Pennsylvania, one of these days, and do some plein air painting! I love the then and now photos!

  2. Robert, I purchased the Washintonville, Anthony, Limestone and Derry Township postcard history. As a newer resident of Anthony TwnShp, I found your book fascinating. You however raised a question that I’ve been unable to have answered. Perhaps you know the answer. What happened to the Saint James Catholic Church in Exchange? The cemetery still exists but all traces of the church building are gone. The photo on page 79 of your book shows a quite ornate and typical Catholic church of the day.
    Here’s hoping you can shed some light.
    Thank you, Walter Evans

    • Robert Swope isn’t the author of this blog, but he very generously allowed me to include some of the pictures from his book. I agree that his books are wonderful, and forwarded your question to him.
      Sheryl

  3. I love the history you show here. I get mesmerised by old photos, just the idea that someone now dead stood where I do. It really really intrigues me. Enjoyed this, cheers.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 927 other followers

%d bloggers like this: