1914 Black Hat

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, May 13, 1914:  Tried to turn milliner and fix up a hat. Mad over the shape, also dyed it with shoe-blackening. Later in day I missed the wonderful creation on which I had spent so much energy. It ended in Ma fessing that she had burned it. All that time wasted too. Oh my.

Was shoe blackening used to dye this hat? Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Was shoe blackening used to dye this hat? Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Note to my Great-Grandmother—

I know that I should be respectful since you are my great grandmother. but how dare you destroy your daughter’ s self-esteem by burning her creative efforts?

Maybe the hat was ugly, but couldn’t you have waited a couple days to destroy it?

Hundred-year-old Bucket Bags

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, May 9, 1914:   Well for the most part it rained today, which kept me indoors a good bit.

1914-03-31 a

Source: Ladies Home Journal (March, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Did Grandma do any sewing on rainy days? Maybe she made a bucket bag.

Yesterday’s Wall Street Journal had an article titled, “The Bucket is Back.” The first sentence said:

If ever there was a moment for the bucket bag, it is now.

Wall Street Journal (May 8, 2014)

What goes around comes around. The bucket bag was equally popular a hundred years ago. The four bucket bags in this post were all featured in the March, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal.

1914-03-31 d

 

1914-03-31 c

1914-03-31 b

Tiny Hat with Wired Frill

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, April 14, 1914: Was housekeeper today. Mother and Ruthie went on a shopping tour. Oh my, they did bring the things home. Ruth got a hat of the latest creation, trimmed and bowed for the family’s spectations.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (March, 1913)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (March, 1913)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Maybe Ruth’s hat had a “wired frill”

. . . Interesting that  Grandma’s sister Ruth bought a new hat after Easter. Easter, 1914 was two days prior to this entry. Maybe the hat was on sale.

Spectations?? Is this another archaic word?

1914 Easter Hats

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, April 10, 1914:  Went to Watsontown this afternoon. Don’t have a new hat for tomorrow. Well, you see it will be Easter, that’s why. Oh, I don’t mean tomorrow; I mean the day after tomorrow.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Whew, another ambiguous diary entry. . .

Did Grandma buy an Easter hat when she went to Watsontown. . . or didn’t she?

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (March, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (March, 1914)

 

1914 Waists (Blouses)

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, March 24, 1914:  Finished my waist today. Got a birthday present. It came a couple of days behind time, but really doesn’t make much difference.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (July, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (July, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

We now know that Grandma was making a waist when she wrote the previous day:

Got a streak of sewing today. . .

Waists is an old-fashioned term for tailored blouses or shirts. They were also called shirtwaists.

1914-07-58-c

1914-07-58.a

How to Decide if You Need Some New Spring Outfits

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Thursday, March 6, 1914:  Same as ever.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

I think that Grandma had cabin fever. From her perspective, a hundred years ago today was just another boring day in a string of boring days.

Going shopping for new spring clothes always give me hope that warmer weather will be here soon. Was Grandma also taking stock of her wardrobe—and considering whether she needed any new outfits?

Here’s some advice from Mrs. Ralston—no first name is provided– in the April, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal:

Personally I shall always believe that a sense of economy is necessary for a true appreciation of fashion. No credit is due the woman who is not obliged to consider ways and means of meeting ends in the selection of her clothes.

I do not believe that the latest fashion should count a cent. In choosing her clothes a woman should only be influenced by the answer to these questions:

  • Are they becoming to me?
  • Can I afford them?

If pressed, one might even omit the second question.

1914 Hairstyles

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, January 26, 1914:  Nothing to write.

1914-02-29.a

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t had “nothing to write” a hundred years ago today, I’ll share pictures of hairstyles in the February, 1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal.

1914-02-29.b

1914-02-29.c

This is the third time that I’ve posted hairstyles. It’s fun to see how the styles have changed–and are starting to look a bit more modern– in subtle ways since 1911:

1913 Hairstyles

1911 Hairstyles

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