Women and Hunting Licenses a Hundred Years Ago

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, October 4, 1914: <<no entry>>

Source: Milton Evening Standard (October 1, 1914)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (October 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Yesterday, I wrote about the suffragettes’ booth at the Milton Fair. Since Grandma again didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I’m still thinking about gender issues. Sometimes I’m amazed by the things that women could and couldn’t do a hundred years ago. Women couldn’t vote, but they could hunt—go figure.

Suffragettes’ Booth at Fair

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, October 3, 1914: <<no entry>>

Source: Milton Evening Standard (October 1, 1914)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (October 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Is Grandma still remembering all the fun that she had at the Milton Fair earlier in the week? When she was at the fair, did she stop by the suffragettes’ booth?

I love how the women’s suffrage question was framed — Motherhood  has become a public function; therefore women need to be allowed to vote.

P.S. There’s a new Friday Update on my author website, Sheryl Lazarus. com.  This week I’m thinking about the nuts and bolts involved in developing a new blog that tells the story of my Great-Aunt Marion who was in the Women’s Army Corps (WACs).

Fair Week

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, September 29–Wednesday, September 30, 1914: Guess I’ll have to commence writing about the weather. Well the weather should come in for its share of notice. You see this is fair week. I mean one with a capital F.

Source: Milton Evening Standard (September 21, 1914)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (September 21, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

Yeah! It’s Fair (with a capital F) week!  The Milton Fair will be sooo much fun. According to last week’s paper there will be a band, a public telephone booth, and fast horses . . . AND (sigh)  to keep parents happy, the fair will have a moral tone with no wheels of fortune.

A New Soda Fountain

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, April 3, 1914: Don’t remember having done anything worthwhile.

Milton-Evening-Standard-4-2-14-d

Milton Evening Standard (April 2, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’m going to share another article from the Milton Evening Standard. Milton is about 4 miles from McEwensville.

It sounds like Milton now had a super trendy soda fountain. I wonder if Grandma ever went there with her friends (or a cute guy), and had a malt or a root beer.

Pictures of the drug store and the soda fountain are on the Milton History.org site.

Mud Season

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Thursday, April 2, 1914: Nothing much doing.

Milton Evening Standard (April 2, 1914)

Milton Evening Standard (April 2, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’m going to do a follow-up to yesterday’s diary entry when Grandma wrote:

. . . Twasn’t nice and warm at all, at all.

I found a clue about what the weather was like in a newspaper article that appeared on the front page of the Milton Evening Standard a hundred years ago today. Milton is located about 4 miles from McEwenville.

Sometimes doing research about a hundred years ago reminds me that I should be grateful for the little things—like paved roads.

Grip Weather: 1914 Shoe Store Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today:

Monday, March 30, 1914:  Went to Watsontown this afternoon. Ma’s on the sick list. I was to get some medicine.

Source: Milton Evening Standard (March 27, 1914)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (March 27, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Did Grandma’s mother have the grip? With all of the wet and gloomy March weather, maybe her feet got wet, and she caught the grip. She should have gone to Marsh’s Shoe Store in nearby Milton and bought some new shoes that would have kept her feet dry.

Fairs A Hundred Years Ago

 18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, October 1, 1913:

October comes with the colder days.

Dresses the trees in gayest attire.

Garners the harvest in fields far and near

Into great heaps that all may admire.

This is Fair Week but not so the weather. Not going this year, so I won’t take it as hard as some.

Milton.Fairground_ferris_wheel_Milton Fairgrounds (This picture may have been taken a few years after Grandma wrote this diary entry). Photo source: Milton History. org.  Used. with permission.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma –

Why aren’t you going to the Milton Fair? You had so much fun last year and even saw an airplane:

Saw a flying machine whirling aloft in the air for at least 10 minutes. I think twas quite a sight to see.

October 3, 1912

There are so many reasons people attend fairs. Here’s what the October, 1913 issue of Farm Journal said about the purpose of fairs:

The word fair, as now used in America, has lost much of its Old world meaning. In this country the fair, whether we call it a world’s fair or a state fair, a county fair or district fair, is an industrial exhibition. And this is as it should be.

It places the fair on a strictly business basis; it makes of it a practical, helpful thing. Conducted on an industrial, practical line, the fair is designed to help both the farmer and the city resident. It is the common meeting ground of all classes. At the fair the man who produces and the man who buys, the grower and the manufacturer, get together. They learn what each is capable of doing, and ascertain each other’s need.

It is remarkable how much benefit we can get out of the fair when we attend filled with a desire to learn—to gain something worthwhile.

The farmer who is seen “taking notes” at a fair—jotting down the name of this big apple, the weight of that monster pumpkin; who writes down all the information he can get about caring for hogs, poultry raising, feeding; who investigates the new kinds of machinery, and secures all available figures about up-to-date methods—that farmer will make his trip to the fair a valuable thing. He can do this and still have plenty of time to accompany his family to the side show, to take a whirl on the merry-go-round, or throw a ball at the doll babies.

Monthly Poem

For information about the monthly poems sees this previous post:

Monthly Poem in Diary

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