Advertisement for Carving Sets for the Thanksgiving Turkey

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, November 25, 1914: <<no entry>>

Adversitement for Carving Sets for Thanksgiving turkey

Source: Milton Evening Standard (November 23, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I thought you might enjoy this advertisement for carving sets. It appeared in Grandma’s local newspaper, the Milton Evening Standard.

Are you prepared for Thanksgiving? You won’t want your guests to think that your turkey was tough just because you don’t have a good carving set. :)

Women and Hunting Licenses a Hundred Years Ago

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, October 4, 1914: <<no entry>>

Source: Milton Evening Standard (October 1, 1914)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (October 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Yesterday, I wrote about the suffragettes’ booth at the Milton Fair. Since Grandma again didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I’m still thinking about gender issues. Sometimes I’m amazed by the things that women could and couldn’t do a hundred years ago. Women couldn’t vote, but they could hunt—go figure.

Suffragettes’ Booth at Fair

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, October 3, 1914: <<no entry>>

Source: Milton Evening Standard (October 1, 1914)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (October 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Is Grandma still remembering all the fun that she had at the Milton Fair earlier in the week? When she was at the fair, did she stop by the suffragettes’ booth?

I love how the women’s suffrage question was framed — Motherhood  has become a public function; therefore women need to be allowed to vote.

P.S. There’s a new Friday Update on my author website, Sheryl Lazarus. com.  This week I’m thinking about the nuts and bolts involved in developing a new blog that tells the story of my Great-Aunt Marion who was in the Women’s Army Corps (WACs).

Fair Week

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, September 29–Wednesday, September 30, 1914: Guess I’ll have to commence writing about the weather. Well the weather should come in for its share of notice. You see this is fair week. I mean one with a capital F.

Source: Milton Evening Standard (September 21, 1914)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (September 21, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

Yeah! It’s Fair (with a capital F) week!  The Milton Fair will be sooo much fun. According to last week’s paper there will be a band, a public telephone booth, and fast horses . . . AND (sigh)  to keep parents happy, the fair will have a moral tone with no wheels of fortune.

A New Soda Fountain

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, April 3, 1914: Don’t remember having done anything worthwhile.

Milton-Evening-Standard-4-2-14-d

Milton Evening Standard (April 2, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’m going to share another article from the Milton Evening Standard. Milton is about 4 miles from McEwensville.

It sounds like Milton now had a super trendy soda fountain. I wonder if Grandma ever went there with her friends (or a cute guy), and had a malt or a root beer.

Pictures of the drug store and the soda fountain are on the Milton History.org site.

Mud Season

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Thursday, April 2, 1914: Nothing much doing.

Milton Evening Standard (April 2, 1914)

Milton Evening Standard (April 2, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’m going to do a follow-up to yesterday’s diary entry when Grandma wrote:

. . . Twasn’t nice and warm at all, at all.

I found a clue about what the weather was like in a newspaper article that appeared on the front page of the Milton Evening Standard a hundred years ago today. Milton is located about 4 miles from McEwenville.

Sometimes doing research about a hundred years ago reminds me that I should be grateful for the little things—like paved roads.

Grip Weather: 1914 Shoe Store Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today:

Monday, March 30, 1914:  Went to Watsontown this afternoon. Ma’s on the sick list. I was to get some medicine.

Source: Milton Evening Standard (March 27, 1914)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (March 27, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Did Grandma’s mother have the grip? With all of the wet and gloomy March weather, maybe her feet got wet, and she caught the grip. She should have gone to Marsh’s Shoe Store in nearby Milton and bought some new shoes that would have kept her feet dry.

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