Brenlin Window Shades Advertisement

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, March 18, 1914:  Nothing really worth writing about.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (October, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (October, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’ll share an ad for Brenlin Window Shades that was in the October,1914 issue of Ladies Home Journal.

I always hated that kind of shade—and have bad memories of pulling too hard on them, and they would unwind and be difficult to fix—but I guess that they once were the new thing.

Cascarets Advertisement

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, March 15, 1914:  Was so put out this morning. Pa said I wasn’t to go to Sunday School. I was anticipating some of the kind. I stayed at home and took a physic. Boo hoo. Carrie came over to see me.

cascarets-9=15-1911.cropAdvertisement in Grandma’s local newspaper,  the Milton Evening Standard (September 15, 1911)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma-

I agree—boo hoo. Sometimes life isn’t fair.

Your dad should let you go to Sunday School. Your tonsillectomy was 5 days ago, and there’s a guy you like who goes to your church, and you’re looking really slender because you haven’t been eating much.  You need to be there!

What’s wrong? Why do you need a physic (laxative)? This is the second time in less than a week that you’ve taken one. Did you take Cascarets? I read that it could cure a lot of different problems.

Carrie Stout was a friend of Grandma’s.

1914 Chalmers “Light Six” Automobile

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, March 5, 1914:  Same as ever.

The master “Light Six” is a car for the whole family. It means clean, healthful recreation that you cannot get in any other way. It means days spent in the crisp, clear air of the country; cool refreshing rides in the evenings, and health-giving outings for the children that are impossible without a car. The “Light Six” will pay for itself in better health and greater happiness.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

This is the fourth day in a row that Grandma wrote “Same as ever.” What was happening (or not happening) in her life? She sure wasn’t putting much effort into her diary.

Yesterday I shared some pictures of 1914 garage designs. Today I’m sharing some pictures of automobiles that provide a sense of how people thought about cars back then. Amazingly, health and happiness were major selling points back then.

The pictures and captions from  an advertisement for Chalmers “Light Six” automobiles in the June 1, 1914 issue of Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine.

Now is the time you want a car most. All of the outdoors welcomes and offers health and happiness to the man with a motor car. You are planning now for vacation time. Nothing will make your vacation so much worthwhile as the possession of a Chalmers “Light Six”.

1914 Chalmers carChalmers “Light Six” will go through any sand or mud and climb any hill that any car can climb. The six-cylinder motor develops up to 50 horsepower.

DSC08674.crop-aIn addition to the touring car, the Chalmers “Light Six” is built as a two-passenger Coupelet. This is an entirely new body type. The Coupelet gives the luxury and the seclusion of the closed car in bad weather, and it is readily convertible to a handsome roadster for business or for touring during the summer months.

1914 Burpee Seed Catalog Advertisement

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, March 2, 1914:  Same as ever.

Source: Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine (March 15, 1914)

Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (March 15, 1914)

The Name Burpee is known the world over as synonymous with the Best Seed that Grow! Are You willing to pay a fair price for selected seeds of the choicest vegetables and most beautiful flowers? If so, it may prove of mutual interest if you write today (a postal card will do) for The New Burpee Annual. This is a bright book of 182 pages that is intensely interesting for every one who gardens either for pleasure or profit. Shall we mail you a copy? If so what is your address? Our address is W. Altee Burpee & CO., Philadelphia

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

It’s the same as ever here, too. . .

March came in like a lion yesterday, and there’s still snow on the ground. Browsing through my Burpee Seed catalog gives me hope that spring will come someday.

Maybe Grandma browsed through the 182-page 1914 Burpee catalog a hundred years ago today, and also dreamed of spring.

(It’s amazing that you could just write W. Altee Burpee and the word Philadelphia on a card, and that it would somehow find it’s way to the company. . . Somehow I think that in today’s more computerized world that a much more detailed address would be required.)

1914 Wilson Dress-hooks Picture Title Contest

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, February 25, 1914:  Something like yesterday.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (May, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (May, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

It was a slow week. This was the third day in a row that Grandma didn’t write much.

Maybe Grandma had time to enter a contest that was in Ladies Home Journal.

The Wilson Dress-hooks contest gave a $100 cash prize for the best title of 8 words or less for this picture.

The contest rules say:

Why tolerate such embarrassment as shown in the above picture?  For the last five years increasing numbers of women  have been exclaiming, “At last I have found a fastening that simply can not be sprung open nor come unfastened!”

Rules

1. Write your title (8 words or less) –the shorter the better. Below it your name and address–nothing more. Only one title accepted per person.

2.  Count Wilson Dress-hooks as two words only. You may use or omit them in your title.

3. Contest closes June 1, 1914.

4. Questions cannot be answered.

1914-05-72.d

1914 Karo Advertisement

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, February 24, 1914:  Ditto

Source: National Food Magazine (February, 1914)

Source: National Food Magazine (February, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

This is the second day in a row that Grandma didn’t write much. The previous day she wrote, “Nothing hardly worthwhile.”

The party that she plans to attend on Friday (and mentioned on the 22nd)—apparently didn’t merit a second mention when she wrote this entry.

What did Grandma do on quiet winter days?  Did she ever bake or make candies using Karo corn syrup?

We worry so much about the health effects of corn syrup today. Who would have guessed that corn syrup has been around for least a hundred years? . . . (though I  think that the recipe for Karo has changed over the years—and that back then it was just corn syrup, not high fructose corn syrup like it is now.)

Correction: After I published this post, I discovered that I’d made an error–and that Karo does not contain high fructose corn syrup. According to a FAQ sheet on the Karo website, Karo is made of regular corn syrup  (glucose only). See comments below for more details.

1914 Carbolated Vaseline Advertisement

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Thursday, February 12, 1914:  Cut a gash an inch long, while drying the dishes, in my hand.

Picked out nuts for a cake. Ruthie made it. It got most too stiff. Could hear her rumbling and grumbling about it for half an hour afterwards at least.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

How the heck did Grandma get a one-inch gash while drying dishes?  I don’t think that I’ve ever been injured while drying dishes.

Maybe Grandma treated her injury with  Carbolated Vaseline. It was a popular ointment a hundred years ago.

Nuts and Nut Cake

What kind of nuts was Grandma picking out—black walnuts? . . .butternuts? . .  hickory nuts?

Several previous posts that you might find interesting include:

Old-Time Black Walnut Cake Recipe

What is the Difference Between Butternuts and Black Walnuts?

Hulling Black Walnuts

How to Crack Black Walnuts

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