Menorah in 1914 Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, May 4, 1914: Nothing much doing for today except to work.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (June, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (June, 1914)

 

What was Grandma doing? It hardly seems possible that the spring housecleaning would last this long, but maybe she was still helping with it.

—-

Occasionally a post takes a surprising twist or turn as I work on it—and goes off on a tangent. Today is one of those days.

I was looking for a 1914 advertisement for some sort of cleaning supply—and found this advertisement for Jap-a-Lac. As I was cropping it, I suddenly noticed that there was a menorah in the picture.

Why was a Jewish symbol in the ad? I know next to nothing about Jewish history a hundred years ago. Did many Jews live in the US in 1914? Did the Glidden Company think that putting a menorah in the ad would increase sales? Were the owners of the Glidden Jewish? . . . .1914-06-33-b

 

1914 Buster Brown’s Darnless Socks Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, May 3, 1914: Was going to a sale this afternoon but changed my mind and went someplace else. Am waiting on my thimble (Ma has it). Want to mend some holes in my socks.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (August, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (August, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma- You need some Buster Brown Darnless Socks!

—-

Hmm . . . This is a really odd diary entry. May 3, 1914 was a Sunday.

The previous day (Saturday), Grandma wrote, “Ditto.”

Did she actually write both of entries at a later date—and get confused about which day was the Sunday? . . . though that doesn’t exactly make sense, since she seems to be writing in the moment.

1914 Kodak Advertisement in Farm Magazine

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, April 28, 1914: Was going for trailing arbutus this afternoon, but the other girls didn’t have time to go, so it’s postponed til tomorrow. Developed my plates. The negatives are spotted some, where they got touched.

Source:  Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine (June 1, 1914)

Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (June 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Yeah Grandma! I’m glad that you’re still taking photos and developing them. This is the first time you’ve mentioned photography in months. What a fun hobby!—though it sounds difficult to get perfect photos.

What did you take photos of? . . . friends? . . . family? . . . or perhaps you convinced your parents to buy your film and supplies by saying that you’d take photos to help keep an accurate record of the farm operations.

1914 Postum Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, April 24, 1914: Didn’t do anything hardly.

Source; Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine (March 1, 1914)

Source; Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (March 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’ll share a fun 1914 ad for Postum. Can you still buy this old-fashioned coffee substitute? I haven’t seen it in years. I wonder if it really was better for us than coffee.

TIZ Foot Soak Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, April 19, 1914:   Was storm staid at church this afternoon. Had on a pair of new shoes and no rubbers, but managed to get home all the same.

Source: Milton Evening Standard (April 2, 1914)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (April 2, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

I hope your shoes weren’t ruined. Do your feet ache from walking home with wet feet? Maybe you’d feel better if you soaked your feet in TIZ.

1914 Underwood Deviled Ham Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, April 17, 1914:  Nothing much doing today.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I’ll share a hundred-year-old advertisement for Underwood Deviled Ham.

According to Wikipedia, the William Underwood Company first made deviled ham in 1868.

The devil logo was trademarked in 1870 and it is the oldest food trademark still in use in the United States. The red devil that debuted in 1895 and started as a demonic figure who evolved into a much friendlier version when compared to the original.

1914-04-76-c

Sometimes I’m amazed which foods have lasted for more than a hundred years.

modern can

modern can

 

1914 Mansion House Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, April 11, 1914:  Nothing much doing.

Source: Watsontown Star and Record (April 3, 1914)

Source: Watsontown Star and Record (April 3, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

The previous day Grandma went to shopping in nearby Watsontown. Did she walk past the Mansion House? It’s still around—though it’s morphed over the years from being a “modern” hotel to being a bar and grill.

DSC03663

Recent picture of Mansion House Bar and Grill

 

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