“How I Knew When the Right Man Came Along”

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, September 19, 1914: <<no entry>>

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Source: McCalls (November, 1913)

I often use material from hundred-year-old issues of Ladies Home Journal. I was surprised to discover this “pot boiler” ad for Ladies Home Journal in the November, 1913 issue of McCall’s. Of course, I had to immediately find one of the article it referred to.

Why didn’t Grandma write anything a hundred years ago today? Back in July there was a diary entry or two which suggested that Grandma liked a guy. I keep wanting to think that she was having too much fun to have time to write in the diary—but who knows—maybe she was just working hard on the farm.

But, here are some quotes from an article in Ladies Home Journal that Grandma might have found useful if she had a beau.

How I Knew When the Right Man Came Along

. . . The following year I went away to college and during my Senior year I met a young physician, an alumnus of a nearby university, who had established a practice in the college town. He possessed the qualities I had so long for: education culture, self-possession, decision in every move. But, strangely enough I seemed to shrink from his physical presence. I tried to argue that it was but a natural modesty, but it set me thinking. Could I trust him? Was he clean? Were his eyes honest. Why did these thoughts come to me over and over? What was wrong? I called myself foolish and tried to reason them away-without success.

At last I determined to do what I should advise any girl to do whom there comes one moment’s questioning of a man’s morality. I went to a friend, an older physician, and hard though it was, asked him to tell me plainly if he knew anything about Doctor Powell that would cause him to withhold his consent to his own daughter’s marriage with him. The kindly talk that he gave me will live forever in my memory.

Doctor Powell and I were never engaged. It were better for me to have lived on bread and water than to have risked my mental and physical happiness with the attractive physician. . .

My disappointment at college had shown me the futility of romantic love. Now I had the opportunity to marry either my dashing attorney or the somewhat prosaic friend that I had known so long. Would marriage with either of them be what it should be? I determined to be in no hurry to make this momentous decision, and meantime to become as well acquainted as possible with both of my suitors.

I began to observe my married friends and to analyze the cause of their happiness or unhappiness. I soon decided that there was just one general rule that seemed to prevail throughout, and this was that an abiding respect and a deep unity of tastes and interests were to be found in every marriage worthy of the name.

Another thing was to be considered, something which in my girlhood I would never have allowed myself to think about, and that was the question of the children I might have. If I had not seen the necessity of putting aside for my own sake all petty considerations and all fleeting ambitions, the duty laid upon me of securing the best possible heritage for those whose lives I would be responsible for would surely have compelled me to do so. . .

Ladies Home Journal (December 1913)

1914 Pomeian Olive Oil Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, September 18, 1914: Nothing to write.

1914-02-61 a

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I thought you might enjoy this 1914 ad.

Sometimes I’m amazed at some of the companies that have been around for more than a century. According to Wikipedia:

Pompeian, Inc. is a food company that was founded in Baltimore in 1906 and produced America’s first national brand of imported extra virgin olive oil.

 

1914 Cold Cream Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, September 8, 1914:  Went to town again and got some of the things I wanted. Did manage to forget some too. When I got home Carrie was here.

1914 Cold Cream Advertisement

Source: Ladies Home Journal (May, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

More details please! What did you buy? Did you buy some Daggett & Ramsdell Cold Cream? You recently got a ride in an auto—and maybe are hoping for another one. It’s vital that you’re prepared!

The previous day Grandma went to town with her father—but had forgotten that stores were closed because it was Labor Day.

Carrie Stout was a friend of Grandma’s who lived on a nearby farm.

1914 Wrigley’s Spearmint Gum Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, August 24 – Thursday, August 27, 1914:  For lack of something to write.

1914 Wrigley's Spearmint Gum Advertisement

Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (March 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

This is the last of four days that Grandma combined into one entry. Since she didn’t write much, I thought that you might enjoy this hundred-year-old advertisement for Wrigley’s Spearmint Gum.

Hundred-Year-Old Likly Luggage Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, August 16, 1914:  We did our packing this afternoon. We are going to make two traveling bags do us. Had quite a time a frisking around. Ruth got company later on. We intend going to Church this evening. Must go and eat my supper, so good-bye old Diary until I return from my trip, for I am not going to take you with me.

Source: Milton Evening Standard (June 1, 1913)

Source: Milton Evening Standard (June 1, 1913)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

Have an awesome time in Niagara Falls! It should be an amazing trip. Were your bags made by Likly?

1914 Kodak Folding Brownie Camera Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, August 8, 1914:  A thunderstorm came on about midnight. Was glad Mr. Brownie wasn’t out in the rain. I tried to picture the result.

Source: Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine (July 1, 1914)

Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (July 1, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Whew, Grandma that was close. Thank goodness you got “Mr. Brownie” in before he got wet.

The previous day, Grandma wrote:

. . . Hope Mother dear doesn’t see this. Something would happen if she did. I bought a brownie. It is a little over a week e’er we go to Niagara Falls, and well the temptation was too great. I didn’t want Ruthie to lay her eyes on that package. She has such a way of divining things. I left Mr. Package under a cherry tree, where I felt sure it would not been seen. After dark I smuggled it into the house and up to my room.

Since Grandma was so interested in photography and developing film, I’ve done several previous posts that included other advertisements that you might enjoy:

1913 Film Tank Advertisement

1913 Kodak Camera Ad

1913 Kodak Vest Camera

1914 Kodak Advertisement in Farm Magazine

1914 Knox Gelatine Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today:

Wednesday, July 29, 1914:  Nothing much these days.

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I thought that you might enjoy this advertisement.

 

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