Royal Easy Chair Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, October 19, 1914:

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma did so much hard physical labor on the farm. Did she ever have time to sit down and put her feet up?

I hope that she had a Royal Easy Chair (though my gut feeling is that the Muffly’s didn’t own any easy chairs).

An aside: If you interested in reading my preliminary ideas, based on readers comments, about how to celebrate the end of Grandma’s diary in late December, there’s a new Friday Update on my author website, Sheryl Lazarus.com. Don’t worry if you don’t have time to look at this site–when it get’s closer to the end of the year, I’ll bring the ideas over to A Hundred Years Ago.

Hundred-Year-Old Swans Down Cake Flour Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, October 13, 1914:  <<no entry>>

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I thought that you might enjoy this 1914 advertisement for Swans Down Cake flour.

100-year-old Bicycle Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Wednesday, October 7, 1914: <<no entry>>

1914-04-107 a

Source: Ladies Home Journal (April, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Sigh . . another day with no diary entry.. . but while we’re waiting for Grandma to pick up her pen, I thought that you might enjoy this hundred-year-old bicycle ad.

Hundred-year-old Clipper Lawn Mower Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Monday, September 21, 1914: <<no entry>>

Source: Kimball's Dairy Farmer Magazine (March 15, 1914)

Source: Kimball’s Dairy Farmer Magazine (March 15, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write anything a hundred years ago today, I’m sharing an advertisement for the Clipper Lawn Mower.

I have lots of crab grass and dandelions in my yard—and I haven’t been able to successfully get rid of them. I definitely need a Clipper. . . wonder where I can find one.

“How I Knew When the Right Man Came Along”

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, September 19, 1914: <<no entry>>

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Source: McCalls (November, 1913)

I often use material from hundred-year-old issues of Ladies Home Journal. I was surprised to discover this “pot boiler” ad for Ladies Home Journal in the November, 1913 issue of McCall’s. Of course, I had to immediately find one of the article it referred to.

Why didn’t Grandma write anything a hundred years ago today? Back in July there was a diary entry or two which suggested that Grandma liked a guy. I keep wanting to think that she was having too much fun to have time to write in the diary—but who knows—maybe she was just working hard on the farm.

But, here are some quotes from an article in Ladies Home Journal that Grandma might have found useful if she had a beau.

How I Knew When the Right Man Came Along

. . . The following year I went away to college and during my Senior year I met a young physician, an alumnus of a nearby university, who had established a practice in the college town. He possessed the qualities I had so long for: education culture, self-possession, decision in every move. But, strangely enough I seemed to shrink from his physical presence. I tried to argue that it was but a natural modesty, but it set me thinking. Could I trust him? Was he clean? Were his eyes honest. Why did these thoughts come to me over and over? What was wrong? I called myself foolish and tried to reason them away-without success.

At last I determined to do what I should advise any girl to do whom there comes one moment’s questioning of a man’s morality. I went to a friend, an older physician, and hard though it was, asked him to tell me plainly if he knew anything about Doctor Powell that would cause him to withhold his consent to his own daughter’s marriage with him. The kindly talk that he gave me will live forever in my memory.

Doctor Powell and I were never engaged. It were better for me to have lived on bread and water than to have risked my mental and physical happiness with the attractive physician. . .

My disappointment at college had shown me the futility of romantic love. Now I had the opportunity to marry either my dashing attorney or the somewhat prosaic friend that I had known so long. Would marriage with either of them be what it should be? I determined to be in no hurry to make this momentous decision, and meantime to become as well acquainted as possible with both of my suitors.

I began to observe my married friends and to analyze the cause of their happiness or unhappiness. I soon decided that there was just one general rule that seemed to prevail throughout, and this was that an abiding respect and a deep unity of tastes and interests were to be found in every marriage worthy of the name.

Another thing was to be considered, something which in my girlhood I would never have allowed myself to think about, and that was the question of the children I might have. If I had not seen the necessity of putting aside for my own sake all petty considerations and all fleeting ambitions, the duty laid upon me of securing the best possible heritage for those whose lives I would be responsible for would surely have compelled me to do so. . .

Ladies Home Journal (December 1913)

1914 Pomeian Olive Oil Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Friday, September 18, 1914: Nothing to write.

1914-02-61 a

Source: Ladies Home Journal (February, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Since Grandma didn’t write much a hundred years ago today, I thought you might enjoy this 1914 ad.

Sometimes I’m amazed at some of the companies that have been around for more than a century. According to Wikipedia:

Pompeian, Inc. is a food company that was founded in Baltimore in 1906 and produced America’s first national brand of imported extra virgin olive oil.

 

1914 Cold Cream Advertisement

19-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Tuesday, September 8, 1914:  Went to town again and got some of the things I wanted. Did manage to forget some too. When I got home Carrie was here.

1914 Cold Cream Advertisement

Source: Ladies Home Journal (May, 1914)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma—

More details please! What did you buy? Did you buy some Daggett & Ramsdell Cold Cream? You recently got a ride in an auto—and maybe are hoping for another one. It’s vital that you’re prepared!

The previous day Grandma went to town with her father—but had forgotten that stores were closed because it was Labor Day.

Carrie Stout was a friend of Grandma’s who lived on a nearby farm.

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