Aunt Annie (Derr) Van Sant and Uncle Homer Derr Across the Years

18-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Saturday, November 22, 1913:  Nothing of importance.

Annie (Derr) Van Sant and Homer Derr (circa, 1955)

Annie (Derr) Van Sant and Homer Derr (circa, 1955)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Today I’m sharing a photo of an aunt and uncle of Grandma’s that was taken years after this diary was written. In the process of doing research for yesterday’s post about the funeral of Grandma’s maternal grandfather, I came across the picture and thought you might enjoy seeing what they looked like in their later years.

The picture is of Annie (Derr) Van Sant and Homer Derr.  Homer died in 1958, so It probably was  taken in the mid- 1950s. They were the two youngest children of John and Sarah Derr. I’m also including the group shot of the Derr family that was taken around 1900, so you can see what they looked like when they were young.

John and Sarah Derr Family. Taken about 1900. L to R. Front Row: John, Annie (Derr) Van Sant, Sarah. Back Row: Miles, Fuller, Alice (Derr) Krumm, Elmer, Phoebe (Derr) Muffly, Judson, Homer. Phoebe was the mother of Helena.

John and Sarah Derr Family. Taken about 1900. L to R. Front Row: John, Annie (Derr) Van Sant, Sarah. Back Row: Miles, Fuller, Alice (Derr) Krumm, Elmer, Phoebe (Derr) Muffly, Judson, Homer. Phoebe was the mother of Helena.

Annie is front and center, and Homer is on the far right.

Homer spent much of his career as a college professor at several universities including the school that is now called South Dakota State University in Brookings, South Dakota. At different schools he taught different subjects—including math and physics. He even wrote a publication that you can still buy today on Amazon called A Method of Petrographic Analysis, Based upon Chromatic Interference with Thin Sections of Doubly Refracting Crystals in Polarizing Light. (I would appreciate it if someone could explain to me in plain English what it is about.)

Annie was the widow of a doctor and lived in Turbotville, Pennsylvania (which is just a few miles from McEwensville).

12 Responses

  1. Well, I can’t help you with that title, except to say that it seems a useful thing to be able to do.

  2. Homer looks like a professor; obviously a brilliant man.
    (Love Gallivanta’s comment!)

  3. It’s interesting to see how much the brother and sister look alike as they aged! I love those old titles that just went on and on–no idea what this one means, though!

  4. I think they aged gracefully, they look so relaxed and confident in that photo. I have a soft spot for that bow tie too. Thanks again for sharing such great history with us!

  5. wow amazing info!

  6. I love old pictures! I always wonder what they are thinking and how they are doing during that time of their life. I always try to see more behind the image!

  7. I love that you have these two different eras of photos of the same people! :)

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