1913 Perspectives on the Importance of the American Revolution

17-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today:

Monday, February 24, 1913:  My essay is almost done, all but the conclusion. Think it will be finished by tomorrow night.

Surrender of Cornwallis at YorktownPicture Caption: The Surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, October 19, 1781; From the painting by Turnbull in the Capitol at Washington (Source: American History for Schools, 1913)

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Grandma was writing an essay on the American Revolution. I always think that the Introduction and the Conclusion are the hardest parts to write.

A few days ago, I told you how the chapter on the Revolutionary War in a 1913 history textbook began. Today, I’ll share the concluding paragraph of the same chapter:

The peace concluded at Paris in 1783 closed one of the most heroic struggles for human liberty that the world has known; but it opened, for the Americans, problems of peace no less serious and difficult of solution than those of war.

American History for Schools (1913) by R.B. Cousins and J.A. Hill

10 Responses

  1. Conclusions are definitely the hardest part of a paper to write. You have to put together a strong summation without repeating what you have already written :-).

  2. Sigh…..makes me glad I’m no longer in school and having to write essays!

  3. I’m learning so much here, thanks Sheryl! I should bring you a virtual apple for your desk. :D

  4. My guess is your Grandma got the best grade on her essay! :)

  5. You blog is not only entertaining… it’s educational! :) Thanks for the wonderful research you do. It’s fun to read about the fashions, food, and everyday life that was common during your grandma’s youth.

  6. [...] 1913 Perspectives on the Importance of the American Revolution [...]

  7. [...] much of February she was working on an essay about the Revolutionary War. Her teacher was going to give the student who wrote the best Revolutionary War essay a two and a [...]

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