Organized Literary Society

17-year-old Helena Muffly wrote exactly 100 years ago today: 

Sunday, October 20, 1912:  

November brings us many things

And among them is Thanksgiving

The first of the snow

The winds that blow

And all that makes life worthwhile.

We organized a Literary Society at school this afternoon. I am one of the committee. Just what I wanted to be.

Her middle-aged granddaughter’s comments 100 years later:

Assuming that Grandma wrote the poem—and didn’t copy it from somewhere—it’s amazing how enthusiastic she was about November. It seemed like she was feeling down in several October diary entries. I hope that November proves to be a better month.

Was the Literary Society like a modern book club? Was it a school club . .  . or did a group of friends organize it? Did both males and females belong. . . or was it a girl’s only club?

I’m glad Grandma got the position she hoped to get. Committee member sounds like a worker bee position. Did the committee members help select books to read? . . bring desserts? . . . clean up after the meetings?

20 thoughts on “Organized Literary Society

  1. I am curious as to what the fifth book in your set is. I have books by Appleton and Zane Grey on my shelves and I think I have a copy of The Rosary. To many books to look through :-).

  2. It’s great that you get to know so much about your Grandma’s younger years, what she did, and especially how she felt about things. I really like the poem, and it was lovely to see the sudden change in her tone as the month changed. :)

    1. Yes–I just pulled a couple old books off the shelf to illustrate the post. Some I’ve read–others I haven’t. Some of them are books from my husband’s side of the family.

  3. I love your old books there too, The Sears Catalogue used to have a bunch you could order back then, I got a kick out of some of the titles that could be ordered…like Thorns and Orange Blossoms by Berta M Clay. I’m sure now a publisher would recommend a Pen Name. ha.

    1. A lot of them had really strange titles. And it’s always fun to see what the stories are about in old books (Some are surprisingly good and some are really bad.)

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